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I built out some 1 ft deep shelves in a 4.5 x 7 ft x 9 ft high garage space over the weekend and used my 510 extensively for the first time. I ran into two issues I would like tips about, accurate table height, and blade depth.

I have a very good adjustable steel square with a level like this:
Image

When I adjust the blade height to 5/8's I find I get about a 1/2 inch depth cut. I was using the saw to cut out some end rabbets to sett shelves on, and could not get the correct height.

Also adjusting the 510 fence to the correct width to the blade face accurately seems like it could be simpler. I measure with the steel square, but the blade has no adjustments other than moving the headstock left or right, and the fence adjusts clumsily. I know the 520 fence is better.

Finally, adjusting the table height up and down is another guessing game. I would be great if there were some way to mark the table height in relation to the head stock. I needed to drill some accurate holes at 3/4 inch above the able height, and I had to mark the piece and make the adjustments by eye, instead of by measurements on the shopsmith.

It was a good build experience, and I made a lot of sawdust, but it would have been a lot easier with good measuring marks / adjustments on the Shopsmith, or if I were at least better educated.

Thanks in advance,

Dan

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There could be a few reasons why you were having difficulties.

1. For the rabbets, the stock may not have been tight to the table. In what size stock were you trying to make the rabbets? A hand-held router with a guide might be a better tool for rabbets. I have a 500, but I can imagine not setting the extension and floating table(s) to same height as the main table might also be a reason why cut depth was not as expected. Or the stock could have been warped or cupped.

2. The blade can be fine-tune adjusted left and right using the quill (unless you are using a zero clearance insert, or ZCI). Try using a regular table insert if you can. For critical width cuts, set the fence a little further away from the blade than required, then advance the quill. Be sure to measure to a saw tooth that is "pointed" towards the fence.

3. There are stop collars available for the table riser legs to make setting the table height repeatable and micro-adjustable. https://www.shopsmith.com/ownersite/cat ... collar.htm

Others will have more possible reasons for your difficulties too, so don't despair ... with practice comes experience and knowledge.

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Some videos on adjusting the fence.





You can also advance the quill to do a small amount of cut width adjustment.

Blade height, try partially engaging the lock so that you can still adjust the height but it holds while you check. Do a test cut on scrap wood.

There is also an adjustable stop collar that you can get. https://www.shopsmith.com/ownersite/catalog/swd_adjustablestopcollar.htm

Rather than the square I would be more inclined to use a set up block. Say a piece of wood that is 5/8 or a piece of 5/8 bar stock or a set of setup blocks
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_dGHAaLHCcI

For drilling there is an adjustable stop for the quill advance, so you don't need to set the table at an exact height, just in the ball park.

In this video he kind of skips over the setting at the 4:00 min mark.


Here is a better video showing how to set the quill advance (depth stop) starts around 2:50.



In your case, where you want the reference to be the table, put a 3/4 piece of wood on the table, advance the bit to touch the wood, set the advance to 0 and lock. :)

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Ron Dyck
==================================================================
10ER #23430, 10ER #84609, 10ER #94987,two SS A-34 jigsaws for 10ER.
1959 Mark 5 #356595 Greenie, SS Magna Jointer, SS planer, SS bandsaw, SS scroll saw (gray), DC3300,

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BigDanS wrote:I needed to drill some accurate holes at 3/4 inch above the able height, and I had to mark the piece and make the adjustments by eye, instead of by measurements on the shopsmith...


As long as you don't need 1/32" accuracy, bring the bit down to the table surface. Zero the quill stop. Then back the quill off until the quill stop reads 3/4", hold it there and zero the stop again and lock it. The bit should now stop 3/4" above the table.

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Just a comment on the setting blade height to 5/8" but only get a 1/2" deep rabbet...I assume you are using the combination square you showed and attempting to hold it above the sawblade to measure to the table. Could it be possible that there is a bit of parallax going on, i.e. you think you are holding the square perfect, but in reality it could be leaning a bit throwing off the measurement of the blade height? I have used a similar combo square for years, but would start there in looking for sources for error in your depth of cut (based on my past experiences with it). Also, as some suggested you can be more precise and either make a known height setup gauge, or buy them (Woodpeckers had a set of these a few months back but it was expensive). Another optionyYou might consider is a height adjustment gauge (below is a pic of a Wixey digital one) as well. Just a thought...
wixey.jpg
wixey.jpg (96.16 KiB) Viewed 1784 times

https://www.rockler.com/wixey-mini-digital-height-gauge
Last edited by RFGuy on Mon May 20, 2019 6:02 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Table height and depth of cut - are these not one in the same when using a Shopsmith?

Fancy gauges and the like are neat but definitely not a necessity. Scribe a line on a piece of scrap wood at the desired height and use that for your depth of cut gauge. Your cut will be as accurate as was the line you scribed.

20190520_130244[1].jpg
Depth of Cut Gauge
20190520_130244[1].jpg (1.47 MiB) Viewed 1772 times


Hmmm. The line must have moved 1/16".

BTW - there is no such thing as scrape wood. Rather cut offs waiting to be needed for something.

As for drilling holes to a controlled depth...use the quill and quill lock.

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"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
Sent from my Microsoft Surface Pro using Firefox.

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My feeling is that you can buy all the fancy tools and use every gimmick available, and yet, your measurements will be only as good as your accuracy in in measuring them and setting them up. If the saw blade isn't cutting the depth you want, you set it wrong.
Always test critical cuts on scrap wood to see what you are actually going to get. Then if is isn't perfect, adjust slightly until it is right.
I find it very easy to move the fence slightly to get the correct width of cut, and even easier to slide the headstock a bit. But, to do that, you need the tubes properly lubed for easy movement.
Depth of cut setting is a two hand job for me. One hand sets depth, and the other locks the table. Again, check all critical cuts on scrap pieces and you will get the cuts you want.

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garys wrote:My feeling is that you can buy all the fancy tools and use every gimmick available, and yet, your measurements will be only as good as your accuracy in in measuring them and setting them up. If the saw blade isn't cutting the depth you want, you set it wrong.
Always test critical cuts on scrap wood to see what you are actually going to get. Then if is isn't perfect, adjust slightly until it is right.
I find it very easy to move the fence slightly to get the correct width of cut, and even easier to slide the headstock a bit. But, to do that, you need the tubes properly lubed for easy movement.
Depth of cut setting is a two hand job for me. One hand sets depth, and the other locks the table. Again, check all critical cuts on scrap pieces and you will get the cuts you want.


I agree with you and all of the other responders. Your measuring tools are only as good as your ability to use them.

For table height the SS adjustable stop collar is the answer. It works perfectly. You set the table to rough height and lock the stop collar. Now you can move the table up or down without using the crank and the table stays where you set it. The stop collar is MUCH more precise than the crank. When you get the table to the correct height just tighten the lock.

For the fence, IMO it is about the technique. I use this technique for the SS and my Powermatic cabinet saw. Loosen the fence and slide it until you get the measurement you want. The next step is the important part. Gently snug up the lock handle on the in-feed side of the fence. That squares the fence. Your measurement WILL change. Then loosen the handle slightly and use the handle to tweak the fence and snug up again. Repeat until you get the correct measurement. Then tighten the out feed lock. It sounds complicated but once you get used to it it is very easy and quick. It becomes second nature.

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John & Mary Burger
Eagle's Lair Woodshop
Hooper, UT

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the easiest way I ever found was to mark the depth of cut on the wood / or a non essential piece and set the table or blade to it ?
,works using the fence as well , that said I have wanted to add graduation marks to the fence .


JMO

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Hobbyman2 Favorite Quote: "If a man does his best, what else is there?"
- General George S. Patton (1885-1945)

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ANY depth,width,height graduation on the fence, quill etc. are at best approximate(use your own definition of approximate). The SS is not a calibrated CNC machine. Manual setting is required(even initially on CNC machines). Test cuts etc. are required. Get used to that.

Sorry to be so blunt, but it was necessary IMO.

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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

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