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Re: You should have warned me...

#256093 by JPG » Mon Jan 21, 2019 10:46 am

amboyna wrote:What is strange is the fact that the page I pulled the 0-8 scale from has a speed chart that goes to 5. I wonder if they were already in the process of changing the scale.


A case of parts and paper work not matching during a transition period.

As for figuring it out, it appeared so from yer pix. Only the 0-8 pix was clear enough to nail(maybe) it down.

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╟JPG ╢
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

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Re: You should have warned me...

#256096 by jsburger » Mon Jan 21, 2019 1:17 pm

JPG wrote:
jsburger wrote:
JPG wrote:The pulley consists of three 'sheaves'. Two outer that are fixed and a center one that slides between the outer ones.

The sheave shown has the 'stop' that the 0-5 version has. Perhaps you have parts from both versions. IIUC only the numbered plate and the sheaves differ.

I have no idea how the crank screw got damaged.


I have two different speed changer manuals. One shows the crank assembled on the pulley side of the main body. If cranked too far the pulley will hit the crank screw. The other manual shows the crank screw on the head stock side of the main body thus avoiding the interference.



Uh Huh

and the one with it mounted towards the headstock is a 0-8 whereas the one with it mounted on the opposite side is a 0-5. ;)


But there is nothing to prevent someone from cranking past 5 and the pulley hitting the crank rod.

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John & Mary Burger
Eagle's Lair Woodshop
Hooper, UT

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Re: You should have warned me...

#256099 by chapmanruss » Mon Jan 21, 2019 2:33 pm

Sorry I am at the end of this conversation but I have a few comments to add from my observations. Ron showed the two types of floating sheaves used in the early to late Speed Changers. I have had 10 speed changers with the Model 10's I have purchased that have come with S/N range of 1077 to 76928. Being an accessory I believe most were purchased later than the original Model 10E or 10ER purchase. None have had the early floating sheave Ron shows in his photos but I have had 3 with the 0-8 scale. I believe these changes came at separate times and for different reasons. The two scales shown below have 0 to 5 equally spaced between both scales and 6 - 8 are above.
Speed Changer indexs r.jpg
Early and Later Speed Changer Scales
Speed Changer indexs r.jpg (310.21 KiB) Viewed 6260 times

The changes made to the Speed Changer during it's production were the sheaves for the Floating Pulley Assembly (see Ron's pictures), the Scales from 0 - 8 to 0 - 5 (shown above) and the retaining ring that holds the floating pulley arm on the main/base casting. On a properly adjusted Speed Changer/Floating Pulley Assembly, no matter which sheaves it had, only the 0 to 5 numbers on the scale would be used. It is why the speed charts for it only reference 0 - 5. The 6 to 8 on the early scale was not used and could have caused some of the breakage of parts on early Speed Changers when users tried to get theirs to go to those higher numbers for a faster speed. I believe the change of the sheaves was to keep users from re-adjusting the outer sheaves allowing the belt to touch the sleeve and lubrication on it. A properly adjusted Floating Pulley Assembly of the later version does not allow the belt to touch "sleeve" parts either.

These are the important things to remember when using the Speed Changer. When installing the Speed Changer the 2 washers should be on the extended set screw between the changer and the headstock. The "jam" nut should only be finger tight and loosened when moving the headstock if any binding occurs. The springs on the Adjusting Screw Assembly should never be compressed by cranking. They are there to act as "shock absorbers". Read the instructions to make sure the Speed Changer is properly installed and set-up.

Replacing a broken Speed Changer has become very expensive. Unfortunately they sell for well over $100 at online auctions.

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Russ

Mark V 520 S/N 09-11-01 completely upgraded to Mark 7, with all SPT's & more.
Model 10ER S/N R64000 first one I restored on bench w/ Shopsmith metal ends & retractable casters. Has Speed Changer, Model 4E Jointer, Jig Saw with lamp, a complete set of original accessories & much more.
Model 10E S/N 1077 oldest one I have restored. On bench w/ Shopsmith metal ends & retractable casters.

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Re: RE: Re: You should have warned me...

#256101 by badtheba » Mon Jan 21, 2019 2:42 pm

chapmanruss wrote:Replacing a broken Speed Changer has become very expensive. Unfortunately they sell for well over $100 at online auctions.


That is the main reason I felt comfortable buying the ER I mention in this thread. I paid $130 for it and the furthest anyone had to travel was less than 5 miles. I haven't gone through everything yet, but it is clean and well maintained, so I expect the speed changer is in good condition as I don't see any damage whatsoever on it.



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Re: You should have warned me...

#256103 by badtheba » Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:32 pm

I just finished work and was going through the box of parts to decide what to bring home. There's an interesting assortment of large diameter arbors and some sort of shaft adapter.

I was mainly just going to get the speed changer off to bring home and clean it up, but decided I'll bring that and the box home to go through it and see what I'll want to keep in my stash.

Will post pics of the arbors for identification later tonight.

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Re: You should have warned me...

#256111 by badtheba » Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:14 pm

Here's the speed changer.Image

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Re: You should have warned me...

#256112 by badtheba » Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:22 pm

And here are the interesting arbors.

I wouldn't be surprised if some or most of these parts are Craftsman, as there's a lathe faceplate and several chisels that are Craftsman.

The threading is 1", 7/8, 3/4, and 5/8". The 1" arbor was partially threaded into the face plate that's pictured. There's nothing too peculiar about the 5/8" arbor except someone put a collar with a set screw on it. They must have just used it as a spacer.

The coupler shaft is 1" O.D. and 3 9/16" long.

I don't know if any of these are Shopsmith, or if they were just compatible, but they could come in handy for grinding wheels or something.ImageImage

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Re: You should have warned me...

#256117 by JPG » Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:05 pm

Maybe the collar is SS, but I do not think anything else is.

An interesting mix. You can do things most of us cannot.

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╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

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Re: You should have warned me...

#256246 by chapmanruss » Fri Jan 25, 2019 5:15 pm

Looking at the 4 arbors my first question is do they have a 5/8" bore to go onto the Shopsmith's spindle? All arbors, chucks and shaper spindles, made by the manufacturers of the Shopsmith for use with it, have a 5/8" bore and a single set screw to attach them to the 5/8" reverse tapered spindle of the quill. The first 1/2" and 5/8" arbors did not have the cuts in the sides of the base for using a wrench. These arbors had a 3/4" machined spacer, two machined washers and a nut. All of which fit on the threaded shaft as seen below.
102-35X and 126-1X r.jpg
1/2" Arbor on left, 5/8" Arbor on right
102-35X and 126-1X r.jpg (551.05 KiB) Viewed 5967 times

On the left is the original 1/2" Arbor and on the right is the original 5/8" Arbor. The average length of the threaded shaft on the 1/2" Arbor is 1-5/8" and on the 5/8" Arbor is 1-15/16". Later the lower sides of the base had cuts onto them for using a wrench to help tighten or remove the nut. Pipe wrench marks are common on these early arbors. Below shows the 5/8" Arbor with the wrench cuts.
126-1X version 2 info.jpg
5/8" Arbor version 2
126-1X version 2 info.jpg (201.16 KiB) Viewed 5967 times

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Russ

Mark V 520 S/N 09-11-01 completely upgraded to Mark 7, with all SPT's & more.
Model 10ER S/N R64000 first one I restored on bench w/ Shopsmith metal ends & retractable casters. Has Speed Changer, Model 4E Jointer, Jig Saw with lamp, a complete set of original accessories & much more.
Model 10E S/N 1077 oldest one I have restored. On bench w/ Shopsmith metal ends & retractable casters.

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Re: RE: Re: You should have warned me...

#256247 by badtheba » Fri Jan 25, 2019 6:35 pm

chapmanruss wrote:Looking at the 4 arbors my first question is do they have a 5/8" bore to go onto the Shopsmith's spindle? All arbors, chucks and shaper spindles, made by the manufacturers of the Shopsmith for use with it, have a 5/8" bore and a single set screw to attach them to the 5/8" reverse tapered spindle of the quill. The first 1/2" and 5/8" arbors did not have the cuts in the sides of the base for using a wrench. These arbors had a 3/4" machined spacer, two machined washers and a nut. All of which fit on the threaded shaft as seen below.
$matches[2]

On the left is the original 1/2" Arbor and on the right is the original 5/8" Arbor. The average length of the threaded shaft on the 1/2" Arbor is 1-5/8" and on the 5/8" Arbor is 1-15/16". Later the lower sides of the base had cuts onto them for using a wrench to help tighten or remove the nut. Pipe wrench marks are common on these early arbors. Below shows the 5/8" Arbor with the wrench cuts.
126-1X version 2 info.jpg
Yes, all arbors/attachments that I pictured have a 5/8" bore and a single set screw. I don't think much of the selection pictured is Shopsmith. No idea what the 1" O D. shaft is for, I cleaned everything up with evaporust and it has no set screw marks on it.

After digging through the box, however, I also found a Shopsmith 1/2" router chuck with a 3/8" bit mounted, and there is a lathe center mounted on the headstock that I haven't been able to get off yet.

The motor screams, so I'll be replacing those bearing shortly.

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