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burnt wrote:Has anyone found any good guidance on what to do about the feed motor if running the powerpro off 220V? I'm planning to switch over to get that extra 1/4hp, but it seems like this would be a problem when it comes to the feed motor. I guess I could just plug the feed motor into a 110V outlet, but I've been waffling on whether to keep the planer or just sell it.

Good thing manual feed is dual-voltage. ;)


I've been plugging my feed motor into a 110v outlet and plug my shop vac into the feed control. Turning on the feed motor will then start the shop vac I have connected to the chip port. It works for me but YMMV.

Just a thought....

Steve

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burnt wrote:No one's going to touch on that one, it seems. I can't seem to find an answer in powerpro documentation, so I might try calling CS to ask for directions for once.



I missed this 'request earlier.

The reason for sparse response is that it is a difficult thing to do and retain both the original function and adhere to electrical codes.

Now let us examine the reason for the safety switch box in the first place.

With the SS mount planer, the infeed is from the backside(away from the Mark 5/V power switch). So the safety stop switch is mounted on that side and in addition to stopping the feed motor, it also stops the SS.(assuming the SS is plugged into the safety switch box!) With the induction motor that switch can be used to turn it all off between workpieces.

Now with the PP, that is not a good thing since the PP needs to 'boot' up after a power interruption.

Also with the PP, the planer is mounted on the other end of the headstock and the infeed end is on the SS power switch side.

IMHO this leaves only the 'Emergency Off' function as viable. In an emergency shutdown, the subsequent PP power up cycle would be a nit.

Now if that last paragraph is 'acceptable', there is a way to cause the planer safety switch to kill power to the PP also.

That be to control a 115v relay coil from the planer safety switch. The contacts on that relay controls the 230v to the PP.

Thus the planer safety switch is plugged into a 115v receptacle. The PP is plugged into a receptacle controlled by said relay. The cord for the relay coil is plugged into the planer safety switch receptacle. An enclosure would be needed to contain the relay and the receptacle for the PP power cord. A 230v power cord supplies the relay contacts.

It got a mite complicated and requires $, but would work.

I leave it as an exercise for any one interested to 'select' the power cord plugs and the receptacles. :D



FWIW this is not a problem with a Mark VII(115v reversible motor). :rolleyes:
Last edited by JPG on Fri May 01, 2015 2:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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╟JPG ╢
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

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burnt wrote:Has anyone found any good guidance on what to do about the feed motor if running the powerpro off 220V? I'm planning to switch over to get that extra 1/4hp, but it seems like this would be a problem when it comes to the feed motor. I guess I could just plug the feed motor into a 110V outlet, but I've been waffling on whether to keep the planer or just sell it.

Good thing manual feed is dual-voltage. ;)


What does the voltage for the Power Pro have to do with the planer feed motor? I assume you are talking a SS mounted planer. How do you do it if the SS is 115? Plug it into 115V? Why can't you do the same thing with the Power Pro at 220V? :confused: :confused: :confused:

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John & Mary Burger
Eagle's Lair Woodshop
Hooper, UT

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jsburger wrote:
burnt wrote:Has anyone found any good guidance on what to do about the feed motor if running the powerpro off 220V? I'm planning to switch over to get that extra 1/4hp, but it seems like this would be a problem when it comes to the feed motor. I guess I could just plug the feed motor into a 110V outlet, but I've been waffling on whether to keep the planer or just sell it.

Good thing manual feed is dual-voltage. ;)


What does the voltage for the Power Pro have to do with the planer feed motor? I assume you are talking a SS mounted planer. How do you do it if the SS is 115? Plug it into 115V? Why can't you do the same thing with the Power Pro at 220V? :confused: :confused: :confused:



With everything '115v', the planer safety switch power cord is connected to a 115v receptacle. The headstock power cord is plugged into a receptacle on the safety switch box. The safety switch then can interrupt power to everything.

With a PP converted to 230v, it would(should to be code compliant) have a power cord plug that will not plug into the safety switch box receptacle nor will the safety switch box supply 230V to the PP.




IMHO (Based strictly on opinion) the additional 'power' gained by conversion to 230v is menial at best(8/7 = 14%), so all this is not too fruitful. I rarely bog down a 1 1/8 hp motor.

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╟JPG ╢
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

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Are we talking about the 110 vdc motor on the side of the ProPlaner. The variable speed motor that drives the ProPlaner feed rollers.

If we are - don't plug it into 220vac or you will need about $400 to buy a new feed motor.

The on/off switch on the control box switches 110vac to the ProPlaner motor AND to the control box. The control box contains a rectifier that converts the 110vac to 110vdc for the feed motor. If you was to apply 220vac to the control box the ProPlaner might run just fine but my guess is that the feed motor would run no more. Now you might get lucky and just blow the rectifier in the control box but I doubt that.

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"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
Sent from my Dell XPS using Firefox.

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dusty wrote:Are we talking about the 110 vdc motor on the side of the ProPlaner. The variable speed motor that drives the ProPlaner feed rollers.

If we are - don't plug it into 220vac or you will need about $400 to buy a new feed motor.

The on/off switch on the control box switches 110vac to the ProPlaner motor AND to the control box. The control box contains a rectifier that converts the 110vac to 110vdc for the feed motor. If you was to apply 220vac to the control box the ProPlaner might run just fine but my guess is that the feed motor would run no more. Now you might get lucky and just blow the rectifier in the control box but I doubt that.



NO Sorta!

AIUI no consideration is being given to powering the DC feed motor differently from 'normal'.

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╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

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Yeah - I gathered that. Unless someone rewires the power cord to the control box.

This might become an interesting read.

maintenance-and-repair-f10/pro-planer-speed-control-box-problem-t2484.html

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"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
Sent from my Dell XPS using Firefox.

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cooch366 wrote:
burnt wrote:Has anyone found any good guidance on what to do about the feed motor if running the powerpro off 220V? I'm planning to switch over to get that extra 1/4hp, but it seems like this would be a problem when it comes to the feed motor. I guess I could just plug the feed motor into a 110V outlet, but I've been waffling on whether to keep the planer or just sell it.

Good thing manual feed is dual-voltage. ;)


I've been plugging my feed motor into a 110v outlet and plug my shop vac into the feed control. Turning on the feed motor will then start the shop vac I have connected to the chip port. It works for me but YMMV.

Just a thought....

Steve


I gotta think on this awhile.

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"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
Sent from my Dell XPS using Firefox.

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cooch366 wrote:
burnt wrote:Has anyone found any good guidance on what to do about the feed motor if running the powerpro off 220V? I'm planning to switch over to get that extra 1/4hp, but it seems like this would be a problem when it comes to the feed motor. I guess I could just plug the feed motor into a 110V outlet, but I've been waffling on whether to keep the planer or just sell it.

Good thing manual feed is dual-voltage. ;)


I've been plugging my feed motor into a 110v outlet and plug my shop vac into the feed control. Turning on the feed motor will then start the shop vac I have connected to the chip port. It works for me but YMMV.

Just a thought....

Steve
I actually like this idea. At the risk of sounding lazy, having to flip a switch for three different motors (DC3300, planer feed motor, and headstock) in three different places just to use the planer wasn't exactly ideal.

Now filing this one in the "now why didn't I think of that?" folder.

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Mark 7 upgrade, 510, 3 500s, mount planer, scroll saw, 3 grey jigsaws (1 w/stand), 5 jointers (1 w/stand),3 bandsaws (2 al., 1 iron), power station, pro fence router table, 3 DC3300s

DeWalt radial arm saws: '56 GWI 10" 1.5hp, '47 GP 12" 2hp, '53 GA 14" 3hp, '47 GP 12" 2hp,

Other faves: '35 Walker Turner drill press, Craftsman (Belsaw) 12" planer/molder, Grizzly G0453Z 15" helical planer, Grizzly G0490X 8" helical jointer, Oneida SMART 3hp dust collector

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dusty wrote:Are we talking about the 110 vdc motor on the side of the ProPlaner. The variable speed motor that drives the ProPlaner feed rollers.

If we are - don't plug it into 220vac or you will need about $400 to buy a new feed motor.

The on/off switch on the control box switches 110vac to the ProPlaner motor AND to the control box. The control box contains a rectifier that converts the 110vac to 110vdc for the feed motor. If you was to apply 220vac to the control box the ProPlaner might run just fine but my guess is that the feed motor would run no more. Now you might get lucky and just blow the rectifier in the control box but I doubt that.

That's my suspicion as well, based on the fate of some of my electronics that were borrowed by someone who does not suspect such things. Said electronics are currently in a landfill in the Babylonian desert.

But anyway, I was just curious if anyone had found any documentation on the feed motor control box when using the PowerPro to run a Mark V(or 7)-mounted planer. Seems like something one might have jotted down while planing that full mile of white oak, y'know?

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Mark 7 upgrade, 510, 3 500s, mount planer, scroll saw, 3 grey jigsaws (1 w/stand), 5 jointers (1 w/stand),3 bandsaws (2 al., 1 iron), power station, pro fence router table, 3 DC3300s

DeWalt radial arm saws: '56 GWI 10" 1.5hp, '47 GP 12" 2hp, '53 GA 14" 3hp, '47 GP 12" 2hp,

Other faves: '35 Walker Turner drill press, Craftsman (Belsaw) 12" planer/molder, Grizzly G0453Z 15" helical planer, Grizzly G0490X 8" helical jointer, Oneida SMART 3hp dust collector

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