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burnt wrote:
dusty wrote:Are we talking about the 110 vdc motor on the side of the ProPlaner. The variable speed motor that drives the ProPlaner feed rollers.

If we are - don't plug it into 220vac or you will need about $400 to buy a new feed motor.

The on/off switch on the control box switches 110vac to the ProPlaner motor AND to the control box. The control box contains a rectifier that converts the 110vac to 110vdc for the feed motor. If you was to apply 220vac to the control box the ProPlaner might run just fine but my guess is that the feed motor would run no more. Now you might get lucky and just blow the rectifier in the control box but I doubt that.

That's my suspicion as well, based on the fate of some of my electronics that were borrowed by someone who does not suspect such things. Said electronics are currently in a landfill in the Babylonian desert.

But anyway, I was just curious if anyone had found any documentation on the feed motor control box when using the PowerPro to run a Mark V(or 7)-mounted planer. Seems like something one might have jotted down while planing that full mile of white oak, y'know?


The receptacle that the SS is normally plugged into is merely 120v ac switched by the control power switch. That switch also supplies power to the DC feed motor control circuit(essentially a rectified dimmer circuit).

If that switch can handle the SS currents, the DC3300 is a snap.

The purpose of this post is to return to the SS mounted control box(not the pro planer). The control boxes are designed/intended for use with 120v ac period.

FWIW I think the larger Pro Planer motors would be more critical of the switch.

Keep in mind that the shut off function is redundant with the Power Pro since the feed/mounting position is moved to the quill side of the headstock and workpieces are fed from the headstock power switch side.

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╟JPG ╢
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

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JPG wrote:
jsburger wrote:
burnt wrote:Has anyone found any good guidance on what to do about the feed motor if running the powerpro off 220V? I'm planning to switch over to get that extra 1/4hp, but it seems like this would be a problem when it comes to the feed motor. I guess I could just plug the feed motor into a 110V outlet, but I've been waffling on whether to keep the planer or just sell it.

Good thing manual feed is dual-voltage. ;)


What does the voltage for the Power Pro have to do with the planer feed motor? I assume you are talking a SS mounted planer. How do you do it if the SS is 115? Plug it into 115V? Why can't you do the same thing with the Power Pro at 220V? :confused: :confused: :confused:



With everything '115v', the planer safety switch power cord is connected to a 115v receptacle. The headstock power cord is plugged into a receptacle on the safety switch box. The safety switch then can interrupt power to everything.

With a PP converted to 230v, it would(should to be code compliant) have a power cord plug that will not plug into the safety switch box receptacle nor will the safety switch box supply 230V to the PP.




IMHO (Based strictly on opinion) the additional 'power' gained by conversion to 230v is menial at best(8/7 = 14%), so all this is not too fruitful. I rarely bog down a 1 1/8 hp motor.
Three pieces (Grizzly planer and jointer, Oneida dust collector) of eqpt. in my garage require 240V, and three others in use (ancient radial arm saw, Shopsmith, and drum sander) are dual-voltage. I'm also hoping to find a decent used air compressor that can handle higher CFM needs (e.g. air sanding), which is almost always 240V (if not 3ph). I'd rather just run dual-voltage equipment on 240V for the time being, because that's what's wired and has capacity.

Reflecting on it, though, you're probably right: the 0.25hp increase wouldn't likely make much difference in anything I'd normally ask of the Shopsmith. Heavy ripping? Shopsmith bandsaw. Heavy crosscuts, miters, bevels, etc.? DeWalt RAS. Lathe? Unless you're inexplicably turning a 30-inch section of lignum vitae, I'd be surprised if you were to run out of horsepower and torque before running out of dimensional capacity. In fact, it seems like full-sized sheet goods are the only reason I ever really bother with table saws (whether Shopsmith configuration or stand-alone), and I don't use them much, so...there's that. /rant

Back to the topic: yeah, sounds like the control box is a no-go for higher voltage. Might as well just stick with 120V until when/if I sell the superfluous planer.

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Mark 7 upgrade, 510, 3 500s, mount planer, scroll saw, 3 grey jigsaws (1 w/stand), 5 jointers (1 w/stand),3 bandsaws (2 al., 1 iron), power station, pro fence router table, 3 DC3300s

DeWalt radial arm saws: '56 GWI 10" 1.5hp, '47 GP 12" 2hp, '53 GA 14" 3hp, '47 GP 12" 2hp,

Other faves: '35 Walker Turner drill press, Craftsman (Belsaw) 12" planer/molder, Grizzly G0453Z 15" helical planer, Grizzly G0490X 8" helical jointer, Oneida SMART 3hp dust collector

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dusty wrote:
dusty wrote:I certainly hope that it works as well as it looks. You have done a fantastic job.


I went back and reread this thread and I have to correct one of my previous comments. Fantastic is inadequate. You have done an unbelievably good job on this. Even the JB Weld application looks professional.

Now, the other big question. How does it work?


A long overdue update. It has been over a year since I converted my planer to manual feed, and finally the stars aligned for me to try it out. I had picked up some very nice white pine dunnage boards at Home Depot a while back and used the planer to remove the dado for the metal strapping. This was my first time of operating any type of planer, and I can see much more in my future as it worked well and surprisingly easy. Cranking the feed handle was kinda like an old mimeograph machine ... easy to turn, and less than a minute for each pass. It wasn't until I was nearly through that I realized I had forgot to clamp the planer to the way tubes, but with the headstock locked and the planer butted up to the left end, it didn't seem matter. Now that I have my first bucket full of shavings, next up I will challenge the planer to some hardwood. Many thanks again to Dusty, JPG, and others for their help and encouragement.

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Well done and congrats on the innovative solution! Those boards look great! I really like the idea of manual feed because you can adjust your feed rate and finish quality.

nothing like a pile of planer shavings! :)

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Jason
'55 Greenie (SN 290310) - restoration in progress
Mark V
SPTs - Jointer, Planer, Bandsaw, Belt Sander
Power Station
Power Station Rev. B
Corpus Christi, Texas

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Oh the irony of it all! You needed a manual gear cover plate. I have acquired the motor and control and now need the motor gear cover(the one you converted!!!).

Any body gots one?

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╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

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Re: Can a 12" Planer w/o feed motor be converted to manual feed?

#251905 by modernamerican » Wed Sep 12, 2018 2:38 pm

My feed motor is missing one button cap, screw, brush and spring. Have not been able to locate a salvage feed motor to scavenge. What did you use to convert to manual feed and where can I get what I need?

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modernamerican wrote:My feed motor is missing one button cap, screw, brush and spring. Have not been able to locate a salvage feed motor to scavenge. What did you use to convert to manual feed and where can I get what I need?


You need to read this thread to get a background on this process. When you reach the Update you will be in the area you need. see that here

maintenance-and-repair-f10/can-a-12-planer-w-o-feed-motor-be-converted-to-man-t16009-s20.html#p186700

It was posted with photos and description of what the owner did on 09 Apr 2015 07:55

Everett

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everettdavis wrote:
modernamerican wrote:My feed motor is missing one button cap, screw, brush and spring. Have not been able to locate a salvage feed motor to scavenge. What did you use to convert to manual feed and where can I get what I need?


You need to read this thread to get a background on this process. When you reach the Update you will be in the area you need. see that here

https://www.shopsmith.com/ss_forum/main ... ml#p186700

It was posted with photos and description of what the owner did on 09 Apr 2015 07:55

Everett


Everett, are not the brush/spring and the screw in cap industry standard? I would think, with a little searching, suitable replacements could be found.

---

John & Mary Burger
Eagle's Lair Woodshop
Hooper, UT

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jsburger wrote:
everettdavis wrote:
modernamerican wrote:My feed motor is missing one button cap, screw, brush and spring. Have not been able to locate a salvage feed motor to scavenge. What did you use to convert to manual feed and where can I get what I need?


You need to read this thread to get a background on this process. When you reach the Update you will be in the area you need. see that here

https://www.shopsmith.com/ss_forum/main ... ml#p186700

It was posted with photos and description of what the owner did on 09 Apr 2015 07:55

Everett



Everett, are not the brush/spring and the screw in cap industry standard? I would think, with a little searching, suitable replacements could be found.


Not knowing the manufacturer is a hindrance.

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╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

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JPG wrote:
jsburger wrote:
everettdavis wrote:
You need to read this thread to get a background on this process. When you reach the Update you will be in the area you need. see that here

https://www.shopsmith.com/ss_forum/main ... ml#p186700

It was posted with photos and description of what the owner did on 09 Apr 2015 07:55

Everett



Everett, are not the brush/spring and the screw in cap industry standard? I would think, with a little searching, suitable replacements could be found.


Not knowing the manufacturer is a hindrance.


Yes, but, brushes are brushes. All one needs is the dimensions. Same with the cap, diameter and threads.

I seriously those are proprietary/unique to the SS motor.

---

John & Mary Burger
Eagle's Lair Woodshop
Hooper, UT

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