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14 posts 1 2

OPR with Pix

#3179 by charlese » Tue Apr 17, 2007 7:23 pm

Opening my self up here, but here are the pictures:

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The third picture is when I used the OPR in vertical position to cope the ends of the rails. Made the rails in two pieces, each 3/8" thick. Installed them in two pieces also. The bottom 3/8" of the rails has a "T" that slides into the grove in the stiles.

O.K. Questions?

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raised panel door.jpg
raised panel door.jpg (100.33 KiB) Viewed 18675 times
horizontal routing.jpg
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side view.jpg
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vertical core box bit.jpg
vertical core box bit.jpg (122.49 KiB) Viewed 18674 times
half in. core box bit.jpg
half in. core box bit.jpg (110.33 KiB) Viewed 18674 times

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Octogenarian's have an earned right to be a curmudgeon.
Chuck in Lancaster, CA

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#3189 by scottss » Wed Apr 18, 2007 9:45 am

Thanks for the pics. I suppose you could make a cheap fence to use in the horizontal position. Can you adjust the height of the bit? Can you set the table at a bevel to achieve a raised panel effect? Oh nice looking door also.

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OPR with Pix

#3197 by dusty » Wed Apr 18, 2007 6:13 pm

Judging from your picture, you do some fine work. The outcome might well be attributed, in part, to the equipment you are using but it certainly speaks for your own craftsmanship. Really nice moldings and joints. Real professional work.

The good things that I read here make me believe that I might have to rethink my next major expenditure. It might have to be a pin router.

I, like many Shopsmith owners, size sheet goods with a circular saw before I bring the pieces to the Shopsmith. I have been very near purchasing a new circular saw and fences for that purpose. Now I have to think about it more. Maybe, just maybe someone tried to tell me this earlier.

[Quote]
I'm not just spouting the company line, guys. Those of you who have taken my classes know that I'm straight up about tools and I don't push stuff you won't use. But in this case, I don't think the company knows what they've got. In fact, I don't think the inventor of the Overarm Router, Norm Bryden (God rest his soul), knew what he had. Come take our Routing & Shaping and our Advanced Routing courses at the Academy. I'll put my router where my mouth is. (How's that for a straight line? Somebody pick up on it, please!)

With all good wishes,
__________________
Nick Engler, Director
Shopsmith National Woodworking Academy
___________________
Making Sawdust Safely

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#3199 by paulmcohen » Wed Apr 18, 2007 7:00 pm

[quote="dustywoodworker"]
I, like many Shopsmith owners, size sheet goods with a circular saw before I bring the pieces to the Shopsmith. I have been very near purchasing a new circular saw and fences for that purpose. Now I have to think about it more.[quote]

There is another thread on the table extensions, but I use them the size Baltic Birch plywood. I find my circular saw just tears up the material. With a 520, front extension, and rear table extension and a roller stand I can support a 4x8 or 60" x 60" sheet by myself without much effort. I just set up all the stands/extensions and then do all my plywood sizing.

I use Cutlist Plussoftware to plan all my cuts before I start. They have a free trial for small projects but most people upgrade to silver fairly quickly.

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#3200 by charlese » Wed Apr 18, 2007 7:08 pm

scottss wrote:.... I suppose you could make a cheap fence to use in the horizontal position. Can you adjust the height of the bit? Can you set the table at a bevel to achieve a raised panel effect? ...


Let me start off by a disclaimer. I'm certainly no expert with the OPR. It's brand new to me. However I'm excited about it's possibilities!

Now - Answers to you questions:
1) You betcha! Here's my version of a cheap fence made from stuff around the shop. (first picture) Safe enough to feel good. Just routed this cut off board to show my set up used make the raised panels (shown on my previous post). This is the horizontal position. The high molecular weight sheet is clamped to the table and the 3/4" hold-down is a piece of scrap.

[Incidentally, the high Molecular plastic is used as a horizontal fence in my previous post when routing the copes for the rails. (the photo of the verticle mode) I drilled a hole in the plastic and fastened this side to the table with a SS fence attachment knob. Clamped the other side to the table, (didn't show in the photo). The clamp in the foreground was used to hole down the table as SS didn't include the "T" nuts in the original shipment. The small piece of oak beneath the clamp was a pad to protect the table. One week later have the "T" nuts.]

The second picture shows the "hold-down" removed - shows the hole on the plastic used for access. The hold down has two functions. a) hold down the piece, b) keep my fingers out of the cutter. Feed direction is from the back of the table toward the front.

2) The height of the bit is set by adjusting the height of the table. That's why I used a Adjustable Stop collar ( shown on my previous thread). Therefore the height of the table (bit) can be adjusted in micro increments, just like a router adjustment. The OPR attachment has a 3" throw,with an adjustable stop. So there is plenty of horizontal movement for the router. (or verticle movement in the vert. mode)

3) Yes Sir, You can tilt the table just like you can in the SS saw mode. Although, don't know why you would want to. I got the raised panels for the cabinet door (photo-previous thread) from a similar set up as shown here. The sample board in the two pics here shows a 5/8" wide groove, 1/4" deep. That's what my door panels have. The router bit market has several bits called "vertical panel raising bits" that you can use in this horizontal mode. Just can't picture a benefit from table tilting.

Since I'm new at the OPR (only had it a week), I'm sure there are other folks out there with a lot more know-how than me on how to set this thing up for different operations. I haven't even tried "pin routing" yet!

I have thought of building a sliding table that would have cleats to fit on both long sides of the SS,OPR table - having a low fence in one side and right angled insert grooves to mount T-Tracks and clamps. That is only a sketchy idea so far. One problem would involve chip (dust) collection.


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set up for raised panel.jpg
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set up  - hold down removed.jpg
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Octogenarian's have an earned right to be a curmudgeon.

Chuck in Lancaster, CA

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#3201 by john » Wed Apr 18, 2007 7:24 pm

Chuck:

That's a very nice door in your original post. It is the quality of work that I aspire to but rarely have the confidence to attempt.

Also nice pictures of your set-up.

John

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#3208 by charlese » Wed Apr 18, 2007 9:57 pm

Thanks guys, for the compliments BUT- - My purpose, of including the close up of the door, was only to show the use of the OPR to make a raised panel with a simple core box bit. It wasn't narcissistic at all. (Well maybe a little.:o )

I'm truly excited over the OPR! Wish I knew more about it! :D

---

Octogenarian's have an earned right to be a curmudgeon.

Chuck in Lancaster, CA

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#3225 by Ed in Tampa » Thu Apr 19, 2007 12:11 pm

charlese wrote:Thanks guys, for the compliments BUT- - My purpose, of including the close up of the door, was only to show the use of the OPR to make a raised panel with a simple core box bit. It wasn't narcissistic at all. (Well maybe a little.:o )

I'm truly excited over the OPR! Wish I knew more about it! :D


Chuck
How many passes did it take to make the raised panel?
Did you run the wood over the top of the bit or was the wood between the table and the bit?

Does the OPR table simply set on the the SS main table? Is there any way to use the table as both a router table and OPR table?

Is it possible to use a router table and insert the OPR inserts into the router plate to allow you to use the OPR?


Guys please keep the information coming on the Overhead Pin Router. I have to upgrade my router table and I'm bouncing all over the place looking at my options. My biggest problem is my present routers are not round body routers so I can't use them in the OPR.

I wish Shopsmith had that combo deal back where they offered the OPR and PC router together.

Has anyone done any mortising on the OPR? How about tendons?

More info please!!!!!! I think the OPR is the best kept secret Shopsmith has and they for some reason simply refuse to talk about the capabilities of the OPR.
I know they have the Router academy but I would like enough info to make an informed purchase decision. Then after I bought it and used it awhile I would be interested in the academy.

I find if you not familar with tool before the academy 90% of the academy goes over your head. either that it or so wow's you that you stop listening while you think about how your going to use the last feature they just showed you. In any case I find I learn my best after I have tried the machine and compiled my list of things I want to know how to do better.

More info !!!!!!!!!!
Ed

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#3237 by charlese » Thu Apr 19, 2007 7:05 pm

Ed in Tampa wrote:Chuck
1) How many passes did it take to make the raised panel?
2) Did you run the wood over the top of the bit or was the wood between the table and the bit?

3) Does the OPR table simply set on the the SS main table? 4) Is there any way to use the table as both a router table and OPR table?

5) Is it possible to use a router table and insert the OPR inserts into the router plate to allow you to use the OPR?

Guys please keep the information coming on the Overhead Pin Router. I have to upgrade my router table and I'm bouncing all over the place looking at my options. My biggest problem is my present routers are not round body routers so I can't use them in the OPR.

I wish Shopsmith had that combo deal back where they offered the OPR and PC router together.

6) Has anyone done any mortising on the OPR? 7) How about tendons?

More info please!!!!!! I think the OPR is the best kept secret Shopsmith has and they for some reason simply refuse to talk about the capabilities of the OPR....

More info !!!!!!!!!!
Ed


Ed: Sorry about adding numbers to your "quote", but had to in order to keep my answers organized.

1) It took 5 passes per side/ setting. I was going to route 1/4" deep so I did it in 1/8" deep passes. (being cautious - didn't want to strain my 1/4" shaft bit). So 10 passes per side Then a couple of little clean up passes to clean up any small ridges. As I routed both sides of the 5/8" panel - there were a total 80 passes + the clean up passes.

2) The panel was between the table and the bit. The table is very smooth, well waxed and slick.

3) Th OPR table simply sets on the saw table with SS "T" nuts to fix the two tables. When I unpacked the OPR - "T" nuts were missing. A quick call got them shipped to me at no charge. In the meantime I clamped the OPR table to the saw table. Noticed that clamping will offer some new possibilities for table placement. BTW "T" nuts were received in 6 or 7 days.

4) I don't think you can use the OPR table with an under table router because of the top-side cut out to accept the two inserts included with the OPR. If you now have a SS router system such as (555413) or (555414) then I suppose you can use that table for both purposes. Don't have experience here, but included with the OPR instructions was a 4 page instruction showing how to convert two tables to the OPR router fence. These instructions were directed to "Routing System (555413)" and "The Free Standing Router Table (555414)" Also included in this paper are instructions for measuring and installing threaded inserts for the OPR fence in the older plywood tables.

5) The OPR inserts are 4" diameter. If you have, or can make an insert recess that is 4" in diameter (round), -- then the answer is YES

6) Mortising is a breeze with a normal SS in Horizontal position. (Think I got this hint from erlicson) I had always done mortising with a router bit on the SS in vertical mode. Even that works O.K. It'll be better yet with the OPR.

7) Tenons and half laps should be a snap in both horizontal and vertical modes. I think the key here is the fence and hold downs. (or use of a sled).

Best Wishes!

---

Octogenarian's have an earned right to be a curmudgeon.

Chuck in Lancaster, CA

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#3240 by reible » Thu Apr 19, 2007 10:42 pm

Hi,

Well it looks like someone has been having fun with the new tool!

Some one was kind enough to point me to the manual on the shopsmith site and now with these pictures I have a really good idea as to how this system works.

As some of you know I have the "old" Overhead Pin Router System. One of these days I will put up some links to pictures in case you don't have any idea what this is. Some of you are going to like it....

After looking things over it looks like a lot of the parts are the same as before and the functions look very much the same in the overarm mode anyway. This also means I can get a lot of the parts for mine should I ever need them.

I want to mention just a few things in this post and then look for a new post on the Joint-Matic with pictures of that. I will then try to get back to this post and we can talk about how the new system works vs the old system....... some things I see as being better and a few I see shopsmith left out.

First thing I noticed Chuck was that in the pictures the part called the "deflector" is not mounted... I had to retrofit my system with that, the casting was not drilled for it... mine is an early model. Any reason that did not get used??

Second thing was about router selection. Mine came with a sears 1/4" router that included a bracket for a light from the router.... that stayed for but a few moments. I had just gotten a Hitachi KM12VC and fell in love with it. Since I didn't want to swapping the router in and out of the overarm router I went ahead and purchase a second one M12VC (same router less the case/plunge base/template guides etc.) I installed that and it has lived there since. (I also have purchased a third one of these routers which I use for a couple of easy switch applications, thus leaving one in the case for hand use.) The variable speed is a major plus on the overarm router setup, at least I find it that way.

I have a couple of the 690's (yes, American made) one of which I use for the J-M. These are the old style single speed 1-1/2 hp. They are nice routers but if I had my choice I'd go with the Hitachi.

OK I've got other things to do yet tonight...

Ed

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