phone  (937) 890-5197

Shopsmith Forums

%nbsp;

35 posts 1 2 3 4

#2744 by charlese » Tue Mar 27, 2007 9:59 pm

berry - Check your private messages

---

Octogenarian's have an earned right to be a curmudgeon.
Chuck in Lancaster, CA

Post a reply  Reply with quote 

#2745 by 8iowa » Tue Mar 27, 2007 10:18 pm

Charlese:

I guess my mind is kinda tired this late in the evening but I can't draw any recollection of your reference to pg 310 of PTWFE out of my old memory bank.

I got the 330 cfp airflow figure out of Shopsmith's 2006 Mk V Accessory Catalog pg 15.

Post a reply  Reply with quote 

#2749 by charlese » Tue Mar 27, 2007 11:43 pm

It says 107 CFM through 1 8' SS hose - With two hoses 100 CFM through each - with three hoses 97 CFM per hose.

So with the help of my math- 3 hoses means the machine is drawing almost 300 CFM.

---

Octogenarian's have an earned right to be a curmudgeon.

Chuck in Lancaster, CA

Post a reply  Reply with quote 

bolts in the dust collector

#2911 by a1gutterman » Thu Apr 05, 2007 9:04 pm

charlese, in an earlier post on this thread, suggested that we use a product called Great Stuff on the protruding bolts in the dust collector to protect the plastic dust bags. I had another solution: When putting my DC3300 together, (recently purchased and after reading this thread), I inserted the bolts from the inside so the plastic bag rests against the round heads rather then the nut and spring washer. If the bags still tear out from the bolts, I will let you all know.:D

---

Tim

Buying US made products will help keep YOUR job or retirement funds safer.

Post a reply  Reply with quote 

DC3300 opinion

#2912 by a1gutterman » Thu Apr 05, 2007 9:22 pm

John, he that started this thread originally, was thinking that the DC3300 was a little pricey. Here is what I came to think about that:

I was looking to buy a dust collector too, and had come to the conclusion that the SS was too much money:eek: . Looking at other dust collectors out there, I found several that were cheaper and rated higher CFM. Then I thought about what you get with the DC3300: All those extra parts that allow the dust collector to be hooked up to your tools and used right now. Those other less expensive units came with nothing. I would have had to purchase quite a system, one that does not come cheap, to hook up my tools. I decided that the DC3300 was a bargain after all. And that was not even the best part. The DC3300 was offered in an e-mail special for $399, so I bought it. That special is over now, but they are now having a sanding sale and the DC3300 is being offered again at $399. I suggest that you jump on it:D .

---

Tim



Buying US made products will help keep YOUR job or retirement funds safer.

Post a reply  Reply with quote 

#2914 by 8iowa » Thu Apr 05, 2007 11:24 pm

This has been a long thread so I apologize if I'm repeating anything:

The 1 and 1 1/2 HP dust collectors that are priced lower than the DC3300 are equipped with canvas dust bags that can only capture dust to around 30 microns. You need to go below 10 microns in order to offer any protection for your respitory system. Thus the cheaper models are basically chip collectors. The DC3300 has a polyester felt bag that is rated down to 7 microns. The optional 24 or 42 inch upper bag takes this rating even lower - at reasonable cost. This is not a place to skimp on dollars. After all, the main reason we are purchasing a dust collector is to protect our lungs.

Also from what I have read so far is that the 1 and 1 1/2 HP units have noise levels in the 82 to 85 decibel range, probably about 10 decibels higher than the DC3300. Since decibel levels are logarthmic, this is a very noticeable difference. Dust collectors this size and larger have their place in larger shops where they are the key component in a permanently piped system. In fact, If I were to set up this type of dust collection system I would construct an enclosure outside of the shop's main wall to house the unit, mainly to keep it's bulk and noise out of the shop.

CFM ratings are somewhat iffy. If you have an adaptor that takes their 4 inch opening down to 2 1/2 inch the cfm will be much less. The length of piping and hose, and the number of bends in the piping system also has a great affect. The DC3300 is designed to be close to the machine and in this capacity it is just about the best small dust collector on the market.

By the way. on page 84 of "Small Woodworking Shops" Taunton Press 2004, author Jim Whetstone describes how to construct a compact ceiling mounted air filtration unit that captures dust down to a few microns. This would be a great addition to your shop even if you do have a good dust collector.

Post a reply  Reply with quote 

#2915 by charlese » Thu Apr 05, 2007 11:37 pm

a1gutterman wrote:charlese, i... suggested that we use a product called Great Stuff on the protruding bolts ... to protect the plastic dust bags. I had another solution: When putting my DC3300 together, (recently purchased and after reading this thread), I inserted the bolts from the inside so the plastic bag rests against the round heads rather then the nut and spring washer. If the bags still tear out from the bolts, I will let you all know.:D


Sometimes - there comes a solution so simple - it is positively genius!!
Nice going Tim!! That solution never occurred to me at all.

---

Octogenarian's have an earned right to be a curmudgeon.

Chuck in Lancaster, CA

Post a reply  Reply with quote 

bolts in the dust collector

#2916 by a1gutterman » Thu Apr 05, 2007 11:47 pm

Ahhh, shucks Chuck, it was nothing:o .

---

Tim



Buying US made products will help keep YOUR job or retirement funds safer.

Post a reply  Reply with quote 

#2919 by john » Fri Apr 06, 2007 5:06 pm

Tim:

After starting this post and looking at some of the other DC's, I agree that for my needs the SS one is a good bet. At $399 I would also jump at it.

Unfortunately the Canadian distributor does not seem to be offering the same packages that are offered in the States and the price here is $625. I will try him to see if he is willing to match the U.S. deal. Even with a sale, prices are 25% higher to allow for exchange, etc. .

Now maybe if I were in Vancouver I could make a deal with you to have it shipped to Seattle and pick it up, but it's a long drive from Montreal.

Thanks to all who offered opinions and suggestions on this subject!

Have fun woodworking!

John

Post a reply  Reply with quote 

#2920 by 8iowa » Fri Apr 06, 2007 5:49 pm

John:
If the Canadian dealer won't offer the sale price, another alternative would be to take a trip to Dayton when the weather gets a little nicer. It would be about 700 miles - a long day's drive. Take a vacation. You deserve it.

Shopsmith's retail store often has demo units on sale at a good discount with full warranty. You can call them first. You could also take a side trip to the Frank Miller Lumber Company which is about 50 miles NW of Dayton in Union City Indiana. This is a real "candy store" for woodworkers.

Post a reply  Reply with quote 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 101 guests

Board indexDelete all board cookies

Welcome to Shopsmith. Please fill in this form and we'll send you more information and special offers for the Shopsmith MARK 7 and other woodworking topics.

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required