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Re: Using a Shop Smith Mark V on a Chris Craft Roamer refit

#266034 by roamer46 » Wed Jan 01, 2020 10:17 am

Happy New Year!

The good news is, I got the port helm cabinet installed and the project has been progressing pretty well recently.

The bad news is, the marina sold to an outfit that doesn't like DIY projects. After two different new managers told me that they understand my situation and that my project is an exception, the latest manager has informed me the tent and boat have to be gone by spring. This really complicates things.

1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: The Port Helm Side Cabinet

Cheers,
Q

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Since I've got to get out by April (reportedly) I called the painter back so he could crank out top coating the V-berth with ICA catalyzed clear in satin. While he was sanding, I was making the last solid mahogany pieces (door jamb etc). The Boatamalan painter laid on four more coats of base, for a total of eight (four were sprayed in the tatami spray booth before I installed the panels). Then he sanded again and sprayed the top coat. It looked great the next day, when I arrived to pull the plastic!

And then I saw it in a photo I took. It was all white. Then I touched it, and it felt like 120 grit. The last part he sprayed is perfectly smooth, but the overspray from that didn't melt in to the top coat around the rest of the room.

The whole thing's oversprayed and has to be sanded and sprayed again.

I'm starting to like the idea of rolling and tipping more and more. Unfortunately, I already bought all of the ICA, and it doesn't roll and tip well.

1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Top Coating the V-berth

Cheers,
Q

Image

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The painter came out and sanded the V-berth, then taped it off, and re-sprayed the ICA varnish. But it turned out poorly again, with nicely flowed out sections while right next to that it was dry as can be. So he did it again, one last time, but this time taping it off and only spraying one section at a time. That approach worked, but geez...these materials aren't cheap. It's insane how much it cost to get that one little room sprayed. As nice as it looks when it's done right, I have to say I'm having a hard time seeing how the end result is worth the cost.

Anyway, it's (finally) done and it looks good.

1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Top Coating the V-berth II

Cheers,
Q

Pardon the dusty lens.
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Some non-Roamer unpleasantness has been thrust upon me, which has taken me away from the project almost entirely. I haven't even had time to keep up on blog posts. But I finally got a small break and posted an article on the bi-fold hatch I made for the salon entry. I've still got to make some mahogany pieces to finish the edges, but it's looking lots better than the Dutch door approach the boat had when we first started the project.

1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: The Salon Entry Folding Door

Cheers,
Q

The old Dutch door
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The new bi-fold hatch
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There was a problem I first noticed when I was test fitting the folding salon hatch that became even more obvious when I took the next step and installed the original door. I've mentioned before that it looked like something heavy had fallen on the port side of the cabin top/dashboard. There was evidence of a major fiberglass repair there, and when we were installing the headliner tracks we had to add material to the bulkhead cleat to bring it into alignment with the salon ceiling frames. The whole thing was low by ~3/8". Which meant the dashboard in that area, which is supported by the same frames, was also low. Which meant the bulkhead it attaches to had been pulled out of square. Which means that the reason the boat had that Dutch door when we found it wasn't because a previous owner liked Dutch doors. It was because the original folding hatch probably got smashed when something heavy landed on the dashboard. But in any case flat hatch panels and doors don't fit right in a structure that's been twisted out of square.

My solution to this will be to 'average out' the gaps by attaching the hinges in non-OEM spots. I don't see any other way of fixing this.

1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: The Salon Entry Door
Cheers,
Q


Test fitting the door and hatch panels
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The door gap
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The hatch gap
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Hi roamer.

I'm still following along! Your persistence in spite of a variety of setbacks is really amazing. Maybe change your forum name to Sisyphus? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisyphus

Unfortunately, I don't have any suggestions about how to fix the door frame gap.

I would also like to say that all the completed work I've seen you post has been of excellent quality and I can't wait to see this boat launch!!

Alan

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Gale's Law: The bigger the woodworking project, the less the mistakes show in any photo taken far enough away to show the entire project!

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Thanks algale!

I'm going with your very own Gale's Law on this one: The bigger the woodworking project, the less the mistakes show in any photo taken far enough away to show the entire project!

This is a huge project, so when I 'average the gaps' they won't hardly show. And if anybody notices, I'll unceremoniously kick 'em off the boat! LOL

Cheers,
Q

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roamer46 wrote:Thanks algale!

I'm going with your very own Gale's Law on this one: The bigger the woodworking project, the less the mistakes show in any photo taken far enough away to show the entire project!

This is a huge project, so when I 'average the gaps' they won't hardly show. And if anybody notices, I'll unceremoniously kick 'em off the boat! LOL

Cheers,
Q


And I am sure the "plank" will be impeccably finished too. ;) :)

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Ron Dyck
==================================================================
10ER #23430, 10ER #84609, 10ER #94987,two SS A-34 jigsaws for 10ER.
1959 Mark 5 #356595 Greenie, SS Magna Jointer, SS planer, SS bandsaw, SS scroll saw (gray), DC3300,

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Re: Using a Shop Smith Mark V on a Chris Craft Roamer refit

#267366 by roamer46 » Fri Feb 14, 2020 10:00 am

HA! Strewth! LOL

The salon hatches are turning out better than I expected. I made some mahogany bits to go around the perimeter of the hatches and fill the gaps between them, the slightly twisted dashboard opening, and the salon door.

1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Fitting the Salon Entry Folding Hatch

Cheers,
Q

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Image

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That looks great, roamer!

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Gale's Law: The bigger the woodworking project, the less the mistakes show in any photo taken far enough away to show the entire project!

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